August 24, 2018

Powerful Public Art Unveiled on Campus

Come by the Rowland Commons on the KCAI campus to experience a dynamic new sculpture – This is NOT a Refuge by Anila Quayyum Agha. Part of the ambitious, city-wide arts festival Open Spaces, the sculpture is a house-like installation made of white laser-cut steel featuring intricate patterns that reflect shadow and light. The work was made at Anila’s direction at A. Zahner in Kansas City. Be sure to take a seat on the bench inside and contemplate this beautiful installation, inspired by the plight of global refugees.

Pakistan-born, Indianapolis-based artist Anila is known for her structures that meld architecturally specific references to themes of global politics, cultural identity, mass media and social/gender roles. Her artwork aspires to be both soothing and conceptually challenging at the same time. This is NOT a Refuge is a temporary, yet significant, addition to the college landscape. Students have just started the Fall semester and the opportunity to see a major installation enriches the curriculum and understanding of what it means to produce large, public works of art.

This project will be on site for nine weeks and represents just one example of the amazing art you will see throughout KC during Open Spaces.  We congratulate the nine KCAI alumni and faculty members who were chosen to participate and exhibit as part of openspaceskc.com. Be sure to visit our two galleries, H&R Block Artspace and KCAI Crossroads Gallery: Center for Contemporary Practice, to see exhibitions and programs as part of The Expanded Field of Open Spaces.

A wonderful new sculpture on the KCAI campus and a ground-breaking 62-day arts festival – two great reasons to celebrate Kansas City’s vibrant arts community this fall.

March 15, 2019

Hoffman Visiting Artist Lecture Presents Visual Artist and Social Critic Titus Kaphar

Can art amend history?  Come and explore new narratives on Thursday, April 4 at 7 p.m. in Epperson Auditorium with visual artist and social critic Titus Kaphar, whose art reimagines historical events. His paintings, sculptures and installations seek to dislodge history from its status as the “past” in order to unearth its contemporary relevance. Kaphar is a distinguished recipient of numerous prizes and awards including a 2018 MacArthur Fellowship, a 2014 Gwendolyn Knight and Jacob Lawrence Fellowship, a 2015 Creative Capital grant, a 2016 Robert R. Rauschenberg Artist as Activist grant and a 2018 Art for Justice Fund grantee. His work is included in the collections of Crystal Bridges Museum, Bentonville, Ark., The Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Perez Art Museum (PAMM) in Miami, amongst others. This free public lecture is underwritten by the Hoffman Visiting Artist Endowment. The purpose is to bring nationally recognized artists who focus on contemporary art practices to give an annual talk to Kansas City Art Institute (KCAI) students, faculty and the Kansas City community, as well as work with students and faculty in their studios. The Visiting Artist is selected through a process administered by a select group of representatives read more…

March 4, 2019

Exhibition at Haw Contemporary Showcases Past and Present Faculty Art

Lineage and Impact: KCAI Faculty Past and Present, March 1- May 4 at Haw Contemporary Stockyards, celebrates seven decades of working artists on the faculty of the Kansas City Art Institute, a community that values making, teaching, and learning art as interdependent, often inextricable practices. Beginning with and paying homage to Wilbur Niewald, who began teaching in 1949, the exhibition honors artwork by luminaries and pathbreakers such as Ken Ferguson, Warren Rosser, Lester Goldman, Jane Lackey, Jim Leedy, Carl Kurtz, Steve Whitacre, Hirokazu Fukawa, Erin Zona, and Milton Katz, as well as emerging talents appointed to the faculty as recently as 2018. In keeping with KCAI’s commitment to forging connections across and between all artistic disciplines and practices, Lineage and Impact represents a multitude of fields: animation, ceramics, drawing, fiber, fiction, film, music, painting, photography, poetry, sculpture, and video, as well as installations and collaborative works resistant to classification. Media on display range from cast glass to silicon circuitry, from combed cotton to works on canvas, from letterpress to digital print, from modular synthesizer to modern languages. This vibrant collection demonstrates the profound historical influence of KCAI’s long tradition of appointing outstanding artists to its faculty—several of the younger artists were read more…