December 6, 2017

Stanley H. Durwood Foundation Endows and Names The Charlie Sosland Chair in Illustration

The Stanley H. Durwood Foundation, under the direction of Charles Egan, trustee, has endowed and named The Charlie Sosland Chair in Illustration. Professor and Program Head of Illustration Steve Mayse will be the first to hold the title.

The Chair in Illustration is named in honor of Charlie Sosland, who served as a KCAI Trustee from 1997-2009 and Chairman of the Board from 2002-2004. “I am very pleased and honored to have my name identified with the Chair of Illustration at KCAI. The art of illustration has an amazing impact on everyone’s lives. I am very grateful to Charlie Egan and the Durwood Foundation for this wonderful honor,” said Sosland.

Steve Mayse is an award-winning illustrator and has been program head of Illustration for 25 years. He’s built a program that draws undergraduate students from all over the world to study at KCAI, and Illustration is the largest major at the college with almost 100 students enrolled.

“I wish to thank Charles Sosland for his continued support and confidence in our work here at KCAI. I will continue, in the years to come, to meet the expectations of this position with honor and integrity. I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve in this capacity and am hopeful that this relationship can remain beneficial to KCAI’s mission and to the community of art practitioners,” said Mayse.

This is the fifth named and endowed position KCAI has announced over the past two years. Endowed chairs are critical to the college’s efforts to attract and retain top faculty. They provide a dedicated source of funds, in perpetuity, to cover a portion of the chair holder’s scholarship, art practice and compensation.

August 31, 2018

Professor James Woodfill and Stephen Lichty Design Installation for New Monticello Library

An installation at the recently-opened Monticello Library in Shawnee, Kan., Mediated Set (Cart Forms and Glass Inclusions), is a collaboration of Painting Professor James Woodfill and New York-based artist Stephen Lichty for a site-specific commission through the Johnson County Public Art Commission. “Our contribution to the Library consists of seven modified book cart sculptures and a set of adjustments to the glass separating the building’s private meeting rooms from an otherwise open plan. As a consequence of our collaborative approach these works represent a full stack of conceptual and material negotiations. Two people looking at the same thing will see something different. Learning to affirm difference has been the virtue and strength of our collaboration, and a virtue that is echoed both by the County’s willingness to commission our experimental project and by the infinite possibilities – the sanctuary – given by any library and the agency of its patrons,” said Woodfill and Lichty in their artist’s statement.  Mediated Set (Cart Forms and Glass Inclusions) is a two-part installation carried out after extensive collaboration with the library designers and staff. The Glass Inclusions were meant as a mediator between the idea of public and private meeting areas, and involved added layers of read more…

August 24, 2018

Powerful Public Art Unveiled on Campus

Come by the Rowland Commons on the KCAI campus to experience a dynamic new sculpture – This is NOT a Refuge by Anila Quayyum Agha. Part of the ambitious, city-wide arts festival Open Spaces, the sculpture is a house-like installation made of white laser-cut steel featuring intricate patterns that reflect shadow and light. The work was made at Anila’s direction at A. Zahner in Kansas City. Be sure to take a seat on the bench inside and contemplate this beautiful installation, inspired by the plight of global refugees. Pakistan-born, Indianapolis-based artist Anila is known for her structures that meld architecturally specific references to themes of global politics, cultural identity, mass media and social/gender roles. Her artwork aspires to be both soothing and conceptually challenging at the same time. This is NOT a Refuge is a temporary, yet significant, addition to the college landscape. Students have just started the Fall semester and the opportunity to see a major installation enriches the curriculum and understanding of what it means to produce large, public works of art. This project will be on site for nine weeks and represents just one example of the amazing art you will see throughout KC during Open Spaces.  read more…